How to Write in Present Tense

Present tense is used to describe actions happening in the present. Present is used to convey a message of “present happenings”. So how to write in present tense?

Present tense can be classified into four types:

  • Simple present tense
  • Present progressive
  • Present perfect
  • Present perfect progressive

Simple present tense

As the name suggests, its ’simple’ present tense.

Sentence structure:

NounàVerb (with s/es)

For example:

  • Danny plays
  • Rose leaves home
  • Wendy drinks coffee
  • Bobby runs fast

You can see in the above examples that the verb takes the present form. The verb suggests that the action happens. That is, it has happened, is happening and will happen too. Remember, it suggests. It can be used to describe an immediate action too. This tense is used to describe an action of a third person.

For example:

First person: How does Anna go to her school?

Second person: She walks.

In this conversation, you can see that first person and second person talk about Anna (third person). Here “Anna walks” means she was walking in the past, in present and will, probably, in future.

Present progressive

Present progressive is used to describe an action that is taking place now.

Sentence structure:

Nounàam/is/areàpresent participle

For example:

  • Betty is running
  • Mona is cycling to the lake
  • Benny is climbing the mountain
  • They are running the marathon
  • I am cleaning the house

You can see in the above example that the verb takes the progressive present form. The action is taking place now. It did not happen in the past and may not happen in the future. The examples talk about the present. The sentence can be about a third person, second person or first person.

For example:

First person: I am losing hope.

Second person: You are winning.

Third person: Rodger is running the marathon.

Present perfect

Present perfect refers to the immediate past.

Sentence structure:

Nounàverb (has/have)àpast participle

For example:

  • Betty has run
  • Debby has played
  • Dash has sneezed
  • You have won the award
  • They have broke the record
  • Minnie has finished her food
  • Jolly has played the piano

In the above examples, you can see that the sentences refer to an immediate action that was completed.

Present perfect progressive

Present perfect progressive refers to the action that had started in the past and is still continuing in the present.

Sentence structure:

Nounàverb (has/have been)àpresent participle

For example:

  • Betty has been swimming
  • Dolly has been running
  • They have been shouting
  • I have been listening

In the above examples, you can see that the sentences refer to the actions that started in the past and that are continuing in the present.


Related Content:

  1. How to Structure and Present Information Clearly and Accurately
  2. How to Write Business Correspondence
  3. How to Make a Present
  4. How to Make Present Bow
  5. How to Calculate Net Present Value

Leave a Reply